Four Signs It’s Time for Senior Living Assistance

Posted by Lexington Square

Our parents care for and rear us from the time we are born and throughout our childhood and into young adulthood. Even as we go through our adult years, they can be amazing sources of wisdom, guidance, and assistance. It’s no wonder that as our parents reach retirement age and their abilities change, it can be disconcerting to notice how the roles begin to shift.

At a certain point, as our mother’s and father’s physical and mental abilities lose their sharpness, we transition to being caregivers and must begin helping them make decisions regarding their day-to-day lifestyle. Making the right decision regarding their needs for care may seem daunting, but there are several signs to watch for that indicate Senior Living Assistance may be the safest and best option.

Here are four such signs to keep an eye on…

Safety Issues

Physical and mental changes in ability can lead to difficulty with daily tasks and increase the potential for accidents. For seniors, falls are one of the biggest threats to safety and have the potential to negatively affect their quality of life thereafter.

If you notice your parent struggling with tasks such as cooking, cleaning, dressing, and bathing, it’s best to preemptively prevent negative outcomes and find a solution that provides assistance with such activities.

Social Isolation

According to MedScape, “Social isolation is a major health problem for older adults living in the community, leading to numerous detrimental health conditions.” Interaction with friends and acquaintances keeps our minds active and sharp. Conversely, sitting home alone and watching television all day will surely lead to a steep decline in quality of life and
health.

Even if you personally spend a lot of time with your parents in their home, it may not be enough. Assisted living communities provide continuous opportunities for interaction–whether it be with fellow residents, resident partners, or visitors such as yourself.

Caregiver Stress

Even the most resilient people can experience feelings of hopelessness and depression while working to take care of their parents or loved ones. You may feel guilty for feeling such things while providing assistance to your mother or father, but you aren’t alone.

Sometimes the best thing to do for Dad is to step back and look at options in which professional caregivers provide quality care with feeding, bathing, and dressing–while you have the chance to spend more meaningful social time with him.

Dementia

Memory is an ability that many of us take for granted. From remembering someone’s name to remembering to turn the oven off, we rely on memory to manage tasks and ensure our safety. According to Psychology Today, the chances of developing dementia, a brain disorder that hinders the ability to remember, increase as we get older. In fact, from the age of 60, this chance doubles every five years we live. 

If you notice your mom beginning to forget details, losing her ability to communicate clearly, or even experiencing mood swings or behavioral changes, it would be advisable to have her checked by a doctor for dementia. Upon receiving a diagnosis, it’s best to explore options for assisted living that offer memory care services that can best cater to her needs, ensure her safety and create an optimal quality of life. 

Most of us want the best for our parents as they grow older when it comes to safety, quality of life, and more. Often the first gut reaction is to try and provide assistance as the adult child, but senior assisted living communities can be an amazing opportunity to provide all the necessary services to keep your mother or father happy and healthy.

Interested in exploring options for your parent? Learn more about Lexington Square’s Assisted Living Communities here. Additionally, check out our e-book, Making the Move: A Step-by-Step Guide for a Smooth Transition to a Senior Care Community.